Uncertain China: Dealing With a Potential Great Power

41st Strategy for Peace Conference
October 26-28, 2000, Warrenton, Virginia

Agenda

Thursday, October 26

Evening Session:

Introductions and initial presentation on the aims and substance of the China security group discussions.

Friday, October 27

Morning Session:
  • "US, China, and Ballistic Missile Defense"—presentations by Elaine Bunn and Frank Januzzi
  • "US, China, and Nonproliferation"—presentations by Evan Medeiros and TBD
This session will open with brief presentations of 10-15 minutes by the persons noted above which summarizes their views on the topics noted, touches on the three to four principal issues surrounding the topic, provides an analysis of where these issues are going in the next one to three years, and concludes with several concrete ideas/policy recommendations for the next administration to consider in order to address the concerns which arise from the issue in question. Open discussion and debate will follow which aims to identify key areas of policy agreement and disagreement.

Afternoon Session:
  • "US, China, and Taiwan"—presentation by Andrew Scobell
  • "US Alliances, China, and Regional Security"—presentations by Robert Ross and Al Willner
This session will open with brief presentations of 10-15 minutes by the persons noted above which summarizes their views on the topics noted, touches on the three to four principal issues surrounding the topic, provides an analysis of where these issues are going in the next one to three years, and concludes with several concrete ideas/policy recommendations for the next administration to consider in order to address the concerns which arise from the issue in question. Open discussion and debate will follow which aims to identify key areas of policy agreement and disagreement.

Saturday, October 28

Morning Joint Session With China Economic Group:

In this joint session, we will discuss how and where economic issues and security issues overlap. In particular, we will consider how China's economic growth (either positive or negative) poses security concerns, how the degree to which largely "economic" concerns of development remain central to China's overall national security strategy, and where the traditional division of issue "baskets" in US policy between "economics" and "security" makes sense for the future.